Horizontal banding is a common decorative architectural feature. It goes at the top of a wall, at the bottom, or somewhere in between.

At the bottom it is called watertable (originally it was for deflecting rain away from the foundation. The top of the watertable projected a few inches away from the building materials below.

Midline banding is located in the middle of a wall. It may run at any height, but is often aligned with the top or bottom of a set of windows or the front entry, or a visual upper level floorline.

At the top it can be called cornice, which is banding directly beneath the roofline, or entablature, which runs between a set of columns and a roof, pediment or balcony. Entablature commonly has a support beam (architrave) that rests on the top of the columns, a frieze, a wide band that may or may not have ornamental art panels, and the upper cornice just below the roofline.

Banding Examples and Definitions

Entablature Banding

Entablature Banding

Two examples of Entablature, banding running above a set of columns and below a triangular pediment on the first and below a small balcony on the second.

Cornice Banding

This example shows a double banding course running under the roofline.

Cornice Banding

This example shows a cornice with decorative brackets. This is a very common feature in certain architectural styles, and we produce several designs of corbels and brackets for this purpose. We also make profiles that have this visual appearance in one piece. This style of profile is called Dentil.

Cornice Banding

This example has a band running across the top edge of the portico, a different cornice at the roofline of the main building (interrupted by a dormer window), and a sloped cap along the edge of the lower roof / balcony.