We have over the years created custom cast stone signs and art pieces in just about any style, size, and color.  This brochure shows much of the range of things we can design and build in cast stone.

Custom art and signage in cast stone

Custom art and signage in cast stone

We produced stone for the Life Sciences Building on the University of North Texas Denton campus. We built the main entry for the building, including the curved sign above the door, and a sculpted sign for the plaza at the corner.

University of North Texas Life Sciences Building

The entry has several parts to it, The curved banding that caps the brick columns, a surround for the door and window above, and the lettering that runs along many panels as well as a wide radius curve.

University of North Texas Life Sciences Building
University of North Texas Life Sciences Building
University of North Texas Life Sciences Building


This is the sculpted sign they put in the plaza between several buildings

University of North Texas Life Sciences Building

Here is a young couple taking photos, with our sign as the background

University of North Texas Life Sciences Building

Closeups of the details.

University of North Texas Life Sciences Building
University of North Texas Life Sciences Building
University of North Texas Life Sciences Building

And a high resolution shot of the sign

University of North Texas Life Sciences Building

You never know, I guess little boys reside in us forever.

As an adult I might not so willingly admit how many episodes, much less reruns of the TV program Hercules I’ve seen. You never in a million years think you will meet him in person much less spend the day with him playing golf. Recently, at a celebrity charity sponsored by Bob’s Steak and Chop House I did just that. Much to my surprise he was the same pleasant spirit, with the same gentleness only real inner strength portrays, and with all that he had the humility he portrayed as my hero Hercules.

Well maybe the humility waned a little on hole number two when Kevin knocked a 250 yard # 3 wood stiff, leaving less than a 10 foot putt, He had the honor of sinking for the second eagle of the day.

For many, Kevin Sorbo’s run on Hercules: The Legendary Journeys And Xena is untouchable, and made him a household name to fans both young and old. He also starred in the adventure movie “Kull the Conqueror”, a story from the author and world of “Conan the Barbarian”. Sorbo’s next major role on the sci-fi series Andromeda made him one of the few nerd icons capable of leaping from swords to spaceships, but the son of Zeus he will forever be. He even reprised the Hercules role in the video game, God of War III – not quite the same character.

In life we suffer many disappointments especially when we elevate people in status and admiration. You know it is nice when your boyhood hero really does turn out to be a hero. He was our team’s hero on the second hole, but it was his role in the low budget film “God Is Dead” that had won me over. His wife and he were on a talk show promoting the movie when I first realized he was a real life hero, the kind of hero that faces such things as a brain aneurysm. To me it was the same as looking death in the eye and smiling only to go on to do even greater things.

I can honestly say if ever there was a fan club I wanted to join it would be Kevin’s. God bless him and thank you for the time, past, present, and by grace the future.

Richard Carey

Richard Carey & Kevin Sorbo

This is a project we producted stone for many years ago, but we just received some photos we wanted to share with everyone.

This home is 100% stone, top to bottom. It has a paneling pattern often used in Italianate and other architectural styles architecture. It creates an impression of horizontal bands and surrounds on the windows and doors.

Cast Stone Residence

Cast Stone Residence

Cast Stone Residence

Cast Stone Residence, Pool and Patio

This pool are shows the paneling pattern up close.

Cast Stone Residence, Pool and Patio

Cast Stone Residence, Pool and Patio

The pattern continues in this veranda area.

Cast Stone Residence, Pool and Patio

A view of the ocean out the window. No actual stone in the shot, just a lovely interior.

Horizontal banding is a common decorative architectural feature. It goes at the top of a wall, at the bottom, or somewhere in between.

At the bottom it is called watertable (originally it was for deflecting rain away from the foundation. The top of the watertable projected a few inches away from the building materials below.

Midline banding is located in the middle of a wall. It may run at any height, but is often aligned with the top or bottom of a set of windows or the front entry, or a visual upper level floorline.

At the top it can be called cornice, which is banding directly beneath the roofline, or entablature, which runs between a set of columns and a roof, pediment or balcony. Entablature commonly has a support beam (architrave) that rests on the top of the columns, a frieze, a wide band that may or may not have ornamental art panels, and the upper cornice just below the roofline.

Banding Examples and Definitions

Entablature Banding

Entablature Banding

Two examples of Entablature, banding running above a set of columns and below a triangular pediment on the first and below a small balcony on the second.

Cornice Banding

This example shows a double banding course running under the roofline.

Cornice Banding

This example shows a cornice with decorative brackets. This is a very common feature in certain architectural styles, and we produce several designs of corbels and brackets for this purpose. We also make profiles that have this visual appearance in one piece. This style of profile is called Dentil.

Cornice Banding

This example has a band running across the top edge of the portico, a different cornice at the roofline of the main building (interrupted by a dormer window), and a sloped cap along the edge of the lower roof / balcony.

Midline banding is generally, any band that isn’t at the bottom or the top. The styles and profiles usable for midline are nearly infinite, the options are less constrained that Cornice or Watertable. The band will usually run aligned with the top of a window surround or entry, or the visual position of a second level floorline, but can go about anywhere.

Many banding applications are rather wide, sometimes more than a foot across. Using multiple profiles makes the individual pieces lighter and easier to install. Several profiles are often stacked together as a single course, (a set of profiles installed together as a single band)

Banding Cross Section

See the attachment hardware and the airspace between in this drawing of a profile family on a brick wall.

Midline Banding Cross Section

This profile family cross-section shows two profiles forming a single wide band. The setting line makes them form a continuous shape that rises from the top and fades back into the brick at the bottom.

Midline Banding

Midline Banding

These two examples show a midline running at the middle of the wall, at the floorline of the second floor. The lower image shows a narrow profile band running into a wider band, made of two identical profiles, with one reversed and a flat panel between them.

Midline Banding

This home uses two midline banding courses, (the lower could be defined as a watertable) . This home also shows one other style of banding. While it is seldom called banding, Quoins can be considered a VERTICAL banding. This home uses fluted square columns as quoins, see the first midline example photo to see a more typical set of quoins running up a corner.

Many banding applications are wide, sometimes more than a foot across. Using multiple profiles makes the individual pieces lighter and easier to install. Several profiles are often stacked together as a single course, (a set of profiles installed together as a single band) Two identical profiles are often used that way, one reversed.

Watertable Banding

The watertable uses two profiles, and serves as a window sill when under a window.

Watertable Banding

A close up of a similar watertable.

Watertable Banding

Here the profile forms the top of the watertable with the stucco below. The profile runs under the window sill here. This corner uses a outside cope to eliminate the need for fragile miter cuts. The photo above uses an inside cope for each profile.

Watertable Banding

This watertable has a cast stone band running across the top, with stone blocks below.

Watertable Banding

Watertable Banding

These are preselected families of profiles we often produce for watertables, there are many other options. The same profiles can even be used in other configurations, varying the setting line, and the materials surrounding the stone.

We produce many types of signage. For Borden we produced custom art that was cast into the tooling, so it came out in relief, with lettering sandblasted into the panel, then all was painted.

The sign is complete, and ready for packing and shipping

Borden Diary Factory - Cast Stone Signage

The sign was installed at their front factory entrance.

Borden Diary Factory - Cast Stone Signage

Borden Diary Factory - Cast Stone Signage

The artwork, lettering and logo for the sign.

Borden Diary Factory - Cast Stone Signage

Several Close ups of the cast stone artwork.

Borden Diary Factory - Cast Stone Signage - Elsie Logo

Borden Diary Factory - Cast Stone Signage - Raised Lettering

An extreme close up of one character on the sign.

Borden Diary Factory - Cast Stone Signage - Close up of lettering

Italianate Style
(1840-1885)

Italianate Style is a rebellion against previous formal classical ideals fashionable since the 1600’s. It developed first in Britain about 1802.

Italianate Home

Italianate Home

    Some of the styles strongest characteristics include low-pitched or flat roofs on two-to-four story tall homes, with wide eaves, decorative paired brackets and cornices. An emphasis on vertical proportions, including tall, narrow windows, the use of columns and quoins, and arches above doors and windows with keystones are also key features of this style. Italianate is also called Tuscan, Bracketed, Italian Villa or High Victorian Italianate Style.

Italianate Home

Italianate Home

Italianate Home

    In the late 1840s to 1890 it became popular in the USA, promoted by the architect Alexander Jackson Davis. The style lost popularity in the late 1870s, superceded by Queen Anne and Colonial Revival styles.

Italianate Home

Italianate Home

Elements of the style

As with any building it may contain elements of a different style, and some elements of the style may be missing on any particular building

Key visual components of this style include:

– Low-pitched or flat roofs; roof often hipped
– Projecting eaves supported by corbels, and cornice structures
– Pedimented windows and doors
– Tall first floor windows
– Angled bay windows
– Attics with a row of awning windows between the eave brackets
– Cupolas or domes
– Quoins
– Loggias (covered exterior hall, usually on an upper level, open on one side with a series of columns or arches)
– Balconies with wrought-iron railings, or Renaissance balustrading
– Balustrades concealing the roof-scape

About 15% of Italianate houses in the United States include a tower

Italianate Home

Italianate Home