Style and Cast Stone – Italianate

Italianate Style
(1840-1885)

Italianate style is a rebellion against previous formal classical ideals fashionable since the 1600’s. It developed first in Britain about 1802.

Italianate Home

Italianate Home

Some of the styles strongest characteristics include low-pitched or flat roofs on two-to-four story tall homes, with wide eaves, decorative paired brackets and cornices. An emphasis on vertical proportions, including tall, narrow windows, the use of columns and quoins, and arches above doors and windows with keystones are also key features of this style. Italianate is also called Tuscan, Bracketed, Italian Villa or High Victorian Italianate Style.

Italianate Home

Italianate Home

Italianate Home

In the late 1840s to 1890 it became popular in the USA, promoted by the architect Alexander Jackson Davis. The style lost popularity in the late 1870s, and was replaced by Queen Anne and Colonial Revival styles.

Italianate Home

Italianate Home

Elements of the style

As with any building it may contain elements of a different style, and some elements of the style may be missing on any particular building.

Key visual components of this style include;

– Low-pitched or flat roofs; roof often hipped.
– Projecting eaves supported by corbels, and cornice structures.
– Pediments on windows and doors.
– Tall first floor windows.
– Angled bay windows.
– Attics with a row of awning windows between the eave brackets.
– Cupolas or domes.
– Quoins.
– Loggias (covered exterior hall, usually on an upper level, open on one side with a series of columns or arches).
– Balconies with wrought-iron railings, or Renaissance balustrades.
– Balustrades concealing the roof.

About 15% of Italianate houses in the United States include a tower.

Italianate Home

Italianate Home

Italianate Architecture and Cast Stone.

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